Tag: gadgets

‘Digital wellness lady’ wants students to unplug or at least look up

Put down the phone .

Image: bob al-greene/ mashalbe

Step into the Center for Digital Wellness and you’ll likely hear parties chit-chat and that’s about it. Because that’s what the Wi-Fi incapacitated apartment at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, is for re-connecting and interacting with your fellow humans no screens, whatchamacallits, or gizmoes in the way.

You might find the center’s benefactor, Sylvia Frejd, a minister and counselor by qualify, in the conversation corner with the fireplace illuminated, or at the so-called “kitchen table, ” ready for a chit-chat and face-to-face interaction. “Look up, ” she admonishes both students and module and staff often walking with their foremen down in their phones. “Experience the world around you.”

It’s no query she’s known as the “digital wellness lady.”

Most recently, Frejd defied students to take a 24 -hour digital quick in conjunction with the National Day of Unplugging, which is no fast feat. “Some students look at us like ‘I could never do that, ‘” she said.

Some of the feedback she got back about the working day was positive: how enjoyable it was; how stress degrees removed; how it felt like a refreshing recharge. Others informed her how challenging it was and how they couldn’t make love. That’s OK, she said in telephone calls last week at the least they are trying.

The conversation corner get used during the Center for Digital Wellness.

Image: kindnes of sylvia frejd

She knows it’s hard to go cold turkey from checking our phones constantly, so she offers some gratuities and opinion to work up to a full day gadget-free. She suggests “mini habit changes, ” like continuing the phone in the backseat while driving; continuing the phone off the counter during dinners or committing to a digital-free congregate or speech with a friend.

Too much of a good thing

Frejd said numerous students leave home for college paucity real-life speech sciences. That’s compounded by the freedom of being on their own for the first time with what feels like unlimited access to mindless video game seminars, long Netflix binges and endless moving through Instagram. “A lot of students havent developed those muscles for face-to-face speech, ” she said.

To get those muscles acting, she opened the wellness midst at the Christian university in the fall of 2014, shortly after co-authoring the book, The Digital Invasion: How Technology Is Determining You and Your Relationships . She pronounces the center’s list is purposely positive and not something like “the Center for Internet Addiction.” “We enjoy our engineering, ” she declares, but it can go too far. The midst has plastered the campus with postings and chalk meanings on the field. Followers have even put in pop-up tents around campus to foster passersby to “look up” and staged a dining hall flare mob.

The “Look Up” flash mob heartens students to unplug.

Image: kindnes of sylvia frejd

She has students referred to her who are on academic probation because of a social media or video game craving. She said numerous can’t turn off streaming videos. She talks them through their cravings which she pronounces generally arising as a result of tension. Research demoes one of the most difficult mental health issues problems at college campuses is suspicion, generally in the form of social tension.

Learning to unplug

Shaquille Cook, 23, moved away from Liberty University two years ago and still works at the school as an adviser but in a recent telephone call he was still as stimulated about the digital detox program as when he was a student-worker at the center. Before he graduated with a certain degree in psychology in 2015, he wrote a review on the center’s Facebook page: “This center is focused on preparing parties for a healthy digital life as well as providing information about others by not being agitated by being on cell phones the working day. Love this place !!!!!!! “

And he still does. The midst coached him how to live a more meaningful life. “The best assistance that I get from it was I was purposefully hiring with people.” His expeditions on the bus generally were devoted to checking Facebook and the information on his phone and listening to music while plugged into his headphones. But because of the center, he realized, “Theres a entire bus full of parties I could engage with.” Most importantly, he’s insisted this lifestyle.

Cook said he’s “intentional and hired with my surroundings” as far as possible, but he knows this is a struggle for a lot of parties. Many have trouble starting eye contact, having real exchanges, and abiding away from the glamour of social media pings , notices and online esteem. “Do not sell your Facebook acquaintances for your real acquaintances, ” he said. “Be hired with real conversation.”

“My job is getting more and more difficult, ” Frejd said.

The digital detox conception is nothing new with expensive gadget-free departures and movements to unplug, but Frejd is trying to tap into the early stages of our telephone addiction by working with new students. She hopes her suggestions can imbue to even younger students whom she speaks with at secondary school and high school exhibitions. With young people coming their first cellphones closer to 10 years old, according to recent acquires, they are “even more immersed in that technology.”

“My job is getting more and more difficult, ” she said.

Personal connection

Her digital crusade all started after looking at her personal life with her babies persistently dallying video games and retorting back that she was always on her laptop. So she started researching how to finagle her digital life.

Frejd opened the Center for Digital Wellness after examining her own digital habits.

Image: kindnes of sylvia frejd

After she worked on the book about the impact of our inventions on our relationships, “shes gone” all in on educating students, adults, and parents on how to handle the digital overload continuing us from talking to each other or exploring mood. Parties tell Frejd, Wow we need this. So she continues educating avoidance, awareness, and education. “I keep talking about it, ” she said.

While Liberty University claims to be the only college campus with a dedicated midst like this, colleges are well aware of the pitfalls of social media and smartphone cravings and have been for years. Frejd said she’s contacted by other academies often who want to implement this type of dedicated cavity for their internet-dependent students.

It’s not all meaningful exchanges and phone-free treads through the quad for Frejd. “People catch me” on the phone, she said, and they say her well-worn utterance back to her: “Digital wellness dame, look up! ” She knows she’ll followed up with come busted for her own bad habits they are very hard to break. Like she said, “We all need to work harder at it.”

WATCH: When the internet runs out, there’s nowhere to hide

Read more:

Samsung Galaxy S8 review: the future of smartphones

Korean houses infinity display pushings smartphone design forward, and its brand-new manoeuvre is packed with the most recent engineering encased in a metal and glass shell

Following the Note 7 debacle, Samsung actually need to see a home run to keep its head in the smartphone busines. Is the almost all-screen Galaxy S8 it?

It seems so. The Galaxy S8 is arguably best available improvement in smartphone design in years and the biggest step forward to the holy grail of an all-screen phone.

The S8 has arcked screens like last years model, but now the top and foot bezels of the phone are much smaller, quantifying 9mm from the extremely top of the manoeuvre and exactly over 7mm from the bottom, giving it a screen-to-body ratio of 83 %.

Samsung
The screen takes up almost all of the figurehead of the S8. Photo: Samuel Gibbs for the Guardian

The long and narrow-minded 5.8 in QHD+ infinity screen provided by big-screen event in a body basically the same thicknes as, and exclusively a little taller than, Apples 4.7 in iPhone 7. The S8s body is narrow-minded at exactly 68.1 mm wide, who the hell is 9.8 mm narrower than the 77. 9mm wide iPhone 7 Plus, 7.6 mm narrower than the 75. 7mm Google Pixel XL and 4.5 mm narrower than last years 72. 6mm S7 Edge, and therefore a lot more manageable to use than the competition.

Samsung is the market ruler in screen engineering, and the S8 has the companys best smartphone display to date. Its simply beautiful, with rich colours, inky pitch-blacks, superb regard directions and a astonishingly big brightness series. It is bright enough to see in direct sunlight but will likewise start extremely dim to realize ending the screen at night much less dazzling.

Out of the box the showing is set to the equivalent of full HD resolution, in spite of the fact that the screen am able to exposing decides up to QHD +. Consumers can opt for QHD +, FHD+ or even a 720 p equivalent( in theory the higher the resolution the shorter the battery life but the crisper the showing ).

The S8 is Samsungs most tactile phone to date. The glass back, arcked boundaries and polished metal surfaces detect huge. Samsungs normal home, back and overview capacitive buttons are gone, instead amended by replacing software sailing keys. The place on the screen where the home button is exposed is pressure sensitive, acting both as a software button and a hardware button in one.

Samsung
The softkey home button can be exposed all the time or just when the screen is on. Photo: Samuel Gibbs for the Guardian

Pressing harder on the home button while the device is in standbies, for example, can be set to wake up the phone, while the button can be deactivated while playing a game unless hard-pressed to bypas incidental activation. It works well.

The camera is flush with the body no camera lump or wedge-shape is necessary for a small invoked bezel to help protect the lens. The S8 is also water resistant to magnitudes of 1.5 m for 30 hours with an IP68 rating, and Cornings Gorilla Glass 5, which should hopefully realize both figurehead and back more scratch resistant.

Specifications

These 3 companies actually made hoverboards that work IRL

Um, yes please.
Image: LExus

Movie fans and tech geeks alike have long shared a common dream: a chance to ride on Marty McFly’s hoverboard, just like in Back to the Future Part II.

When the date portrayed in the movie, October 21, 2015, came and passed, though, the gadgets we most commonly thought of as hoverboards had two wheels and a propensity to explode, which definitely wasn’t the future any of us were envisioning the first time we saw that iconic hoverboard chase sequence.

But levitating skateboards are already here. They might not anywhere near as commonplace as the Back to the Future universe foretold, but that doesn’t mean the tech will never reach the streets (or at least a few inches above them) IRL.

There are quite a few projects that have teased the potential for real, working hoverboards and if we can have self-lacing Nike Mags, a Biff Tannen-esque figure in the White House, and World Series Champion Chicago Cubs, surely we can also have real, honest-to-God hoverboards… eventually.

Here are three companies that have made functional hoverboards, to varying levels of success. Through their efforts, we might someday finally fulfill those Marty McFly fantasies.

Hendo Hover

First up: Hendo Hover. The company behind the hoverboard, called Arx Pax, is mainly focused on harnessing electromagnetic energy through its Magnetic Field Architecture (MFA) system to create more sustainable, “floating” foundations for structures in the face of extreme weather. The Hendo board is a fun side project that serves as a proof of concept for the MFA system.

The Hendo design uses disc-shapedmagnetic hover engines located on the bottom of the board, which depend on an opposing magnetic fieldfound on a specialized surface below to provide lift. Unfortunately, you can’t just ride it anywhere but the system does actually allow riders to truly hover off the ground.

The boards first took on a rider in 2013, then launched on Kickstarter with a developer’s kit the next year and showed up in its first public prototype form with none other than skateboarding legend (and hoverboard hoaxer) Tony Hawk onboard. Version 2.0 of the Hendo launched in 2015, which was the last we heard Arx Pax about board development as the company has focused on applying its MFA tech in other areas.

Omni Hoverboards

Omni‘s hoverboard design takes a different route to get its passenger in the air, using a system of propellors to take to the sky it goes much higher than just hovering a few inches above the ground. It’s closer to a drone than a skateboard, evoking less of a Marty McFly vibe and more like something the Green Goblin from Spider-Man might use to fly around.

Catalin Alexandru Duru, Omni’s creator, developed his first prototype over the course of a year before setting out to break the Guinness World Record for the longest flight on a hoverboard back in May 2015. He only needed to fly 50 meters (about 165 feet) to break the previous mark but he wound up zooming around for 275.9 meters (905 feet 2 inches) at heights of up to five meters (16 feet), obliterating the record in the process.

That mark was bested last year by a jet-powered rig, but Duru continues to hone his craft, taking it to France for flight demos and showing it off in a Hyatt ad to cap off 2016. The company aims to have a consumer-facing prototype ready by the end of this year, so keep an eye on the skies for one of these someday soon.

Lexus Hoverboard

Carmaker Lexus threw its hat into the hoverboard development ring, too, flexing its engineering muscles beyond the world of luxury vehicles. Starting in June 2015, the company released a set of teasers claiming it had created a real life, rideable hoverboard, piquing interest with footage that appeared to show the board floating in an otherwise normal skatepark.

When the final product was unveiled a few months later with a video showing pro skater Ross McGouran shredding up the skatepark in Barcelona, it really looked like Back to the Future‘s 2015 wasn’t too far away but there were some caveats.

Like Hendo, the Lexus board depended on a magnetic field to provide the hover power, so the skatepark was specially built for the ride. The smoke coming from the board wasn’t just some cool add-on feature, either in order to work, its components were cooled by liquid nitrogen to maintain a frigid temp of minus 197 degrees celsius.

Unfortunately for hoverboard enthusiasts, custom magnetized skateparks aren’t too common, and Lexus made it clear that the board wasn’t going to be released for consumers. For now, at least, the campaign was just a flight of marketing fancy to prove Lexus has the capability of creating something spectacular.

These three innovators have scratched the surface of hoverboard tech, and, given time and development, show that the experience is at least possible With future technological strides, what they began could eventually give everyone a shot at a real-life Marty McFly experience.

Ever wish you could fly?

Experience The Possible in virtual reality on the Within app.

Click here to download the Within app to watch The Possible.

WATCH: New self-balancing Solowheel might replace your hoverboard

Facebook’s top VR researcher explains why augmented reality is the future

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at his company’s annual F8 developer meet .

Image: AP/ REX/ Shutterstock

Augmented reality is the future because it’s a lot more socially acceptable than virtual reality. That was the surprising sense from Chief Oculus Scientist Michael Abrash at F8.

During his parcel of the keynote, when numerous in attendance may have suspected he would dive more passionately into Oculus’ recent virtual reality advancements, Abrash instead laid down by an ambitious see for how how augmented actuality will eventually become as ubiquitous as the personal computer.

That Oculus’ top scientist depleted almost half an hour talking almost exclusively about augmented actuality , not virtual reality, may seem surprising, specially considering Facebook time exhausted its first real social VR app for Oculus, Facebook Infinite.

But Abrash made it quite clear why Facebook is so heavily invested in augmented actuality. In short, virtual reality will never be as ubiquitous as AR, because it will never be socially acceptable to use VR headsets in public, even if you are able do so safely.

On the other hand, “full AR, ” as Abrash described, will merely necessary transparent glasses that look like the eyeglasses parties already wear.

“Bright as the future of VR is though, and knowing what my crew at Oculus Research is working on I’d say it’s very bright surely, there’s one key points that they are able to never be VR’s strong suit: always on, go-everywhere, mixed actuality, ” Abrash said.

“Because no matter how good VR comes, few people would be comfortable fraternizing with someone whose eyes they can’t participate and social adequacy is an ultimate requirement for anything we wear in public.”

“Social acceptability is an ultimate requirement for anything we wear in public.”

That may sound self-evident, since anyone who has tried a VR headset could tell you it’s not socially acceptable to wear outside a gaming deep-seated. Abrash’s observes, nonetheless, are just a few of the most powerful commands we’ve examined hitherto on why Facebook is investing so heavily in augmented reality.

It’s too a little bit of a reality check( pun intended) for the VR community. “Bright” as the future of VR is, it indicates there are some very real limits to how far information and communication technologies can go.

That doesn’t mean that there’s no target for virtual reality, however.

“VR will be the most immersive way to interact with the virtual macrocosm and it will revolutionize how “were working” and play, ” Abrash said.

But if it’s not something that will be socially acceptable in public, it raises the issue of whether VR will be able to expand beyond its niche appeal. If everyone will have AR glasses in five or 10 years as Abrash foresaw, how many parties will too miss clunky VR headsets?

WATCH: Facebook shows off its intelligence interface the investigations and … wow

Facebook’s head of Oculus explains why augmented reality is the future

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg words at his company’s annual F8 developer consultation .

Image: AP/ REX/ Shutterstock

Augmented reality is the future because it’s much more socially acceptable than virtual reality. That was the surprising content from Chief Oculus Scientist Michael Abrash at F8.

During his portion of the keynote, when numerous in attendance are likely to have supposed he would dive more deeply into Oculus’ latest virtual reality promotions, Abrash instead laid down by an ambitious seeing for how how augmented world will eventually become as ubiquitous as the personal computer.

That Oculus’ top scientist invested almost half an hour talking almost exclusively about augmented world , not virtual reality, may seem surprising, specially considering Facebook really released its first real social VR app for Oculus, Facebook Cavity.

But Abrash made it quite clear why Facebook is so heavily invested in augmented world. In short, virtual reality will never be as ubiquitous as AR, because it will never be socially acceptable to use VR headsets in public, even if you could do so safely.

On the other hand, “full AR, ” as Abrash described, will only compel transparent glasses that look like the eyeglasses beings already wear.

“Bright as the future of VR is though, and knowing what my unit at Oculus Research is working on I’d say it’s very bright undoubtedly, there’s one key area that will never be VR’s strong suit: always on, go-everywhere, mixed world, ” Abrash said.

“Because no matter how good VR gets, few people would be comfortable socializing with someone whose hearts they can’t receive and social propriety is an absolute requirement for anything we wear in public.”

“Social acceptability is an absolute requirement for anything we wear in public.”

That may sound self-evident, since anyone who has tried a VR headset could tell you it’s not socially acceptable to wear outside a gaming prepare. Abrash’s remarks, nonetheless, were some of the strongest terms we’ve heard hitherto to the reasons why Facebook is investing so heavily in augmented reality.

It’s likewise a little bit of a reality check( pun intended) for the VR community. “Bright” as the future of VR is, it hints there are some very real limits to how far information and communication technologies can go.

That doesn’t mean that there’s no residence for virtual reality, however.

“VR will be the most immersive style to interact with the virtual macrocosm and it will revolutionize how “were working” and play, ” Abrash said.

But if it’s not something that will be socially acceptable in public, it grows the question of whether VR will be able to expand beyond its niche plead. If everyone will have AR glasses in five or 10 years as Abrash predicted, how many beings will likewise demand clunky VR headsets?

WATCH: Facebook establishes off its intelligence interface research and … wow

Hands on with the Positron Voyager VR chair

The Positron Voyager VR chairs won’t become you nauseating .

Image: raymond wong/ mashable

Tom Cruise lied and told me I’d feel like I was swimming in zero gravity.

OK, Cruise didn’t really lie to me IRL, but he did in VR, after I strapped on an Oculus Rift VR headset and sat down in a Positron Voyager VR cinema chair to try out the The Mummy: Zero Gravity VR Experience at SXSW 2017.

The Positron Voyager was introduced at the Sundance Film Festival in January. Like all immersive theater chairs you know, such as those 4D movie chairs that rock backward and forward to become “youre feeling” every explosion the Voyager promises to become you feel like you’re in the movie.

The key differences between the Voyager, which resembles an egg chair from the 1960 s, and existing 4D sets is that it’s designed just for VR movies and it likely won’t give you flow sickness.

At least, I didn’t appear the slightest fragment sick during my “ride, ” and neither did my colleague Karissa Bell.

The Positron Voyager chairs are positively comfy.

Image: raymond wong/ mashable

The cinema room I sat in contained 20 Voyager sets, and as you’d expect from a “VR theater“, once you’ve got a headset on your look and over your eyes, you’re perfectly cut off from the outside.

And while most VR content spurs you to look in all directions, the Voyager’s semi-contained enclosure principally guides your attention to what’s immediately in front of you more like a regular movie.

Sure, you are able coming behind you, but it’s not really comfortable to do so in the chairs. Forming around to look behind you likewise means being blasted by the Subpac haptic orators that are built into the back cushions.

As smooth as the Voyager’s mechanical flow was, I was extremely disappointed in The Mummy: Zero Gravity VR Experience . The behind-the-scenes VR experience left me demanding more a lot more.

After putting on the Rift headset, Cruise builds agitation and apprehension, let me tell you something you’re gonna feel like you’re swimming in zero gravitation with him and The Mummy co-star Annabelle Wallis as the Hercules plane you’re in fails out of the sky.

The only problem was, I never felt like I was in a plummeting aircraft , nor did I appear weightless not even the slightest. I exactly find closer to the screen like I was watching a movie in IMAX.

Even with my feet heightened off the ground from the chair’s tilt, I didn’t feel much whiz, and unquestionably wasn’t feared, which was a pity because the whole item of sitting in this thing was to feel something . The chair tilted and curved in such gentles and slow channels, so as not to persuade flow sickness, that it is impossible to simulate any realistic haptic feedback.

The Voyager wasn’t alone at fault here. After all, it was programmed specifically to tilt gradually to simulate the feeling of swimming in zero gravitation. It’s probable the chair could have revolved quicker and tilted at a more aggressive tilt to make it appear more like the plane was plummeting, but the company wouldn’t elaborate on it.

Coming soon to a theater near you.

Image: raymond wong/ mashable

Still, despite the weak Zero Gravity VR video I realized and the fact the company’s still not sharing any details about when the Voyager will arrive( exactly “soon” I’m told) at theaters, I’m confident about the VR chair’s potential to help become “VR theaters” more than exactly a niche. As immersive as some VR content is, a bit flow departs a long way towards obligating it appear more realistic.

The Galaxy S8’s not even out yet and YouTubers are already torture-testing it

In 2017, you don’t buy a pricey brand-new premium telephone, unbox it, and devote hours admiring its beautiful industrial motif. No, the cool occasion to do now is to drop it until it’s all smashed up, and then pole responded demolition on YouTube.

YouTuber EverythingApplePro “ve managed” come Samsung’s Galaxy S8 ahead of its official propel and act various sag assessments to see how it props up against an iPhone 7 Plus.

It’s a bit pain to watch two brand-new telephones get tortured, but it’s all worth it. While the Galaxy S8’s glass back is destroyed approximately instant( as expected ), the larger and longer bezel-less “infinity display” is unquestionably more durable than the iPhone 7’s screen, even when stopped from a height of 25 feet.

Both screens end up cracked and marred in all places, but in the end, the Galaxy S8’s screen is considerably less crushed, which is quite impressive.

Want more demolition? Here’s YouTuber TechRax taking a knife and hammer to the S8’s front :

Image: Youtube/ techrax

(< em >< strong> Update :< em> It should go without saying that you should not try any of these unscientific assessments at home, and the phones shown in the videos may not accurately show the durability of final retail prototypes. We don’t condone attempts to damage or destroy the Galaxy S8 or any telephone to the point where its artillery could explosion .)

Read more: { Visit local.marketele

Loading...
X